The Majacraft Blog The official blog of Majacraft

28Oct/173

UK Fibre Retreat

Glynis and Owen are now home safe and sound again after their international travels, in which they had many adventures (and I am pretty sure Owen also caught some fish!). We shared some of their journey on our Facebook page, and in this post, Glynis shares with us a more in depth look at the retreat they attended in the UK, organised by Ruth of 'The Wheel Ewe.'  Thank you Glynis for sharing this with us!

                                                                         Statue at Bridlington Bay

 

With jet lag forgotten we can now reflect on the amazing Wheel Ewe Retreat that we attended in Edinburgh early in October. It was held at the very nice Capital Hotel, which provided us with excellent rooms and very good meals over the two days. Rooms for the workshops were spacious, well lit and nicely warm. Organised superbly by Ruth Robinson owner of The Wheel Ewe, the retreat attracted spinners from all around the UK as well as from Europe. So keen were many of them that they started arriving a couple of days before the  scheduled start.

Ruth had brought together a great mix of tutors with a huge amount of expertise and experience.  All of them are published authors of books on their specialist subjects.
Jane Deane kicked the retreat off with a journaling class. We were given wooden covers with a number of pages to insert once we had woven the cover design which was based on the style of Scottish artist, Charles Rennie Macintosh.

Journalling class with Jane Deane

Jane gave us a base picture that we were to look at closely and she directed us how make our way far enough into the picture  that we could design a yarn depicting the chosen part. There was heaps of fibre in all the possible colours for us to spin yarns for either of the two pictures supplied. It was a great exercise that was enjoyed by all.


During the event Jane also taught  spinning exotic fibres and it sounded as though the wallaby was a real challenge. I saw some great examples of the outcomes though.
Sarah Howard and Elisabeth Kendrick were there to teach several weaving classes which included pattern making and of were based around a rigid heddle loom.  The range of garments that these ladies had on display to show the possibilities of a simple loom was amazing. Every day they both appeared in some new and beautiful garment. This is Sarah wearing one of her woven garments.


DJ Stefek from the Shetland Islands inspired all in her Turkish spindling classes and  the beautiful fine work done by both her and her students was fantastic.

DJ Stefek spindling class

Janet Renouf Miller had silk spinning as her specialist subject and a wide range of options for using silk in spinning were taught.

Ruth herself taught an art yarn class, with tail spinning and also a brand new technique that she had  discovered herself. This was a fun class that I was pleased to have the opportunity to attend.

Ruth had asked me to show how to spin on a stylus and I must say the students were very fast learners and I think all mastered the technique very quickly. We spun merino sliver,  colourful rolags from the blending board, and lastly cotton sliver which is well suited to stylus spinning. This fibre caused a little perturbation, but again all turned out a good yarn.


Owen spent his time checking wheels for everyone which certainly was much appreciated. He had also prepared a short presentation for the attendees to see the Majacraft factory in operation and to see the people who make our products, Andy, Rob, Lance, Andrea, and Amanda, with Dylan and Toni helping out when needed.

Probably the best thing about retreats is the opportunity to meet and learn with other people who share your passion, and we absolutely loved meeting so many new friends.
We want to thank Ruth, her husband Jonathan, son Nathan, and daughters Sarah Jane and Anita, and friend Alex, for all their efforts in planning and delivering such a wonderful retreat. I do hope there will be more and fingers crossed that we will be invited to attend again.

 

21Sep/173

21st Anniversary Celebrations at Majacraft!

September 2017 marks 21 years since the Poads started with Majacraft, and we have been making the best spinning wheels and tools we can make ever since! It is very rewarding to see some of the wheels made in those early days still out and about with their spinners, and just as rewarding to have been able to further develop and evolve Majacraft Wheels into our newest models, shipping all over the world!

We would like to mark this special occasion with something special and we have been busy planning some awesome anniversary treats this month. In fact, we are so thrilled to have reached this milestone, that we have decided to keep the celebrations going till the end of the year! Starting on the 20th of September and running through till 20 Dec 2017, we will be sending out free gifts with every Majacraft Wheel order you place with us! Keep reading for more details..

And what will those special gifts be? We would like to share with you two brand new products that will be launched during this celebration. These two products will be sent out initially as gifts with Wheel orders, but  after 1 October we will also be making them available to all our customers via our wonderful dealers worldwide.

Firstly we are proud to introduce our new Niddy Noddy! This Rimu and Bamboo niddy noddy is lightweight, easy to use, and comes apart to flat pack when you're out and about or when not in use. It will give you a standard 1.5m skein. The ends are made of curved, lightweight bamboo and they are easily fitted to the Rimu centre post with easy tighten bolts.

We also bring you a bonus bobbin! Lilac is a favourite of Glynis Poad, her grandmother grew Lilacs in her garden :) And so we have honoured her with her own Special Edition 21st Celebration Bobbin colour, a gift to every customer ordering a new Majacraft wheel  (except the Aura) during our celebration months! These will also be available to order from your local Majacraft Dealer from October 1st.

We will be offering a Special Gift with every Majacraft Spinning Wheel order made between 20 Sept to 20 Dec 2017

 

With your wheel purchase you will receive:

  • With all wheels (except the Aura)
    • The brand new Majacraft Niddy Noddy:
    • 2 Special Edition 21st Celebration Lilac Bobbins
  • With your Aura order:

This special occassion Gift offer is available on all spinning wheel orders made between 20 Sept to 20 Dec 2017. If you have been thinking about treating yourself and your fibre to a wonderful new wheel, this is a great time to make your order and pick up some extra goodies!

 

27Feb/174

Majacraft Livestreams are coming!

Starting next month Majacraft will be hosting some special live broadcasts to both showcase their wheels and tools as well as answer your questions. Are you thinking of buying a wheel but aren’t sure which one is right for you? Or do you already have your Majacraft wheel and want to get some tips and tricks on making the most of it? Maybe you have a problem and could use some troubleshooting? Glynis Poad and Suzy Brown will be hosting these sessions, and we aim to make them informative and interactive, everyone is welcome! There will be a Q&A time during each livestream, so please send in your questions before the event, or join the chat on the day to ask! For anyone unable to attend please still post your questions on the event page and we will answer them during the livestream for you to watch later.

Following the live sessions, all videos will remain available as recordings on the Majacraft YouTube channel, come back and rewatch anytime.

Each session will run via YouTube, anyone can view, and if you want to join the live chat alongside the stream you only need to be logged into your YouTube account to participate.  We will post links to each session here on the blog once we have those set up, and we will also create a Facebook Event for each session, you will be able to find the links there too and  you will get a reminder when we are about to start! You are invited to ask your questions either during the event or earlier by posting on the Event page, we would love to know what you are most interested in!

Please make sure you are following our Facebook page for further updates on these live events!

March 27

1pm NZ Time
(Sunday 26 March 5pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 8pm Eastern Time)

Topic: Majacraft Wheels 101

Answering the FAQs on basic wheel use and Maintenance
Attaching and removing your flyer
Threading the flyer and different Majacraft orifices
Where to oil (and not oil) your wheel
Drive Band Maintenance - when to replace and when to cut and rejoin (for stretched bands)
Tension cord- to cross or not to cross?
Spinning head height

3 April

1pm NZ Time
(Sunday 2 April 6pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 9pm Eastern Time)

Topic: Wheel Focus: Get to know your Rose

New Rose Assembly Tips
What can you spin on a Rose?
Tension - scotch tension explained
Head adjustments for best spinning results
Accessories for the Rose

10 April

1pm, NZ Time
(Sunday 9 April 6pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 9pm Eastern Time)

Topic: Wheel Focus: The magic of the Little Gem

Why this is such a great travel wheel
Drive bands - direction and twist
Tips for easy treadling
Drive Band troubleshooting - when to replace?
Accessories

8 May

1pm NZ Time
(Sunday  7 May 6pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 9pm Eastern Time)

Topic: What’s on our wheels?

Glynis and Suzy share their spinning, show you their stash, and put their Majacraft wheels through their paces to show you what they are spinning and how they have their wheels set up for it. Share your pics and ask your questions during the livestream!

15 May

1pm NZ Time
(Sunday 14 May 6pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 9pm Eastern Time)

Topic:  The Suzie’s  - to Pro or not to Pro, what is the difference?

New wheel assembly tips
The history of Majacraft and the Suzie Wheel
Accessories for the Suzie and Suzie Pro
How do you choose between the Rose, the Suzie or the Aura?

22 May

1pm NZ time
(Sunday 21 May 6pm US Pacific Time, Sunday 9pm Eastern Time)

Topic: the Awesome Aura

What makes this ‘THE’ Majacraft wheel for spinning designer yarns
Assembly tips for the Aura
Modified Double Drive explained
Adjusting your wheel to suit your spinning
Expanding your range with the right accessories
The stylus kit - how great is this for longdraw on the Aura! Head tilting for max effect
Troubleshooting and wheel maintenance

10Jan/160

Michele Peddie: Tutor Profile!

Majacraft Camp is just around the corner, with just on four weeks to go till we all gather for much fiber fun! Preparations are well under way and I know Glynis has been super busy making up goodie bags, assembling equipment, and arranging important things like food, and coffee. And of course we have such a fantastic range of workshops to look forward to! In a previous blogpost we shared some information about the amazing Pat Old, who will be teaching some flax weaving at Camp, and this week we would like to introduce Michele Peddie, a VERY talented fiber artist, who will be guiding us thorugh the Journal making process that runs alongside the entire weekend. The idea of the journal is that we will be creating our own record of the weekend, this can include class notes, fiber and yarn samples, inspirations and visual journalling.. in fact it can be whatever you want to record of the weekend, all bound together in a specially made set of wooden covers which we will also decorate during the weekend!  We will be supported, inspired, and guided by Michele throughout this process.

Michele Peddie is a textile designer, fibre artist and graphic designer by trade. Having returned to university as a mature student to complete a Bachelor of Design - Textiles, she is now keen to impart and share some of that knowledge with fellow fibreholics. Michelle explains her vision for the Majacraft Camp Journal as follows:

"The journal is about how to collect your ideas, notes and experiments and record them in a visual journal, rather than scrapbooking which can be very neat and tidy with photos etc. My visual diaries tend to get stuffed with lots of 'things' in the creation process.  Instead of looking at an already created yarn and then trying to replicate it, I am hoping, along with Suzy, to show you a fresh way of coming up with ideas for colour and texture for your yarns and how to record these ideas so that they can be used over the weekend and in the future. This will be a fun exercise and I will be there to help throughout the weekend."

Michele shared this image with us, as an example of how she collects inspiration and ideas to add to her visual journal:

Here are some examples of Michelle's work to further inspire you!

We are sure you will enjoy Michele's passion and enthusiasm for the art of fibre, and the creation of your Majacraft Camp 2016 Journal!

 

 

 

 

24Aug/156

Choosing the Right Carding Cloth

For the Majacraft Fusion Engine Drum Carder 

Majacraft now has in stock both the 72tpi and the 128tpi carding cloth for the amazing new Fusion Engine Drum carder. This raises a few questions! The first, and most important one is, ‘which cloth doth suit me best?’ So we thought it might be useful to create a guide to help you with that decision. What follows is really a full tutorial about carding, with extra info and tips for getting the results you want from the cloth you choose. For a quick guide, scroll down to the two flowcharts to check which carding cloth works best with the fibres you plan to card!

A while ago I made a review of the carder, and also a video  to show some of the amazing things that are possible with it, and highlight some of the unique ways this carder is different from others currently on the market.

That video was made entirely on the 72TPI carder, and in it I showed how I made both a smooth blended batt and a textured art batt.  When I have time I will make a similar one with the 128TPI cloth! In the meantime however, I wanted to share some information that might make it easier to decide which carding cloth you want to start out with. Of course the upside is that the drums are interchangeable so you can also be confident that you are not going to be stuck with the ‘wrong’ carding cloth if your carding needs change in a year or two..

So here’s the thing, the important thing. Your carding cloth just needs to be matched up with the kind of fibre you are ‘mostly’ going to be carding. You can make a smooth batt or a textured batt on pretty much any carder, so long as you have a cloth that is appropriate to the fibre you are using. Generally speaking this means that if you have coarse fibre you need a coarse cloth, for example most of your carding is going to be Lincoln, or Leicester, then you would want to consider a coarse cloth in the 45-52TPI range. If the majority of your fibre is fine, such as Merino, Alpaca, or Cormo, then you need to look for a carding cloth in the ‘fine’ range, 92TPI and over. Majacraft is providing a very versatile 72TPI cloth that works great on most fibres, and for those wishing to focus on the finer fibres as the majority of their carding, the 128TPI cloth is wonderful!

This is how it works, ‘TPI’  stands for ‘Tines Per Inch’ and refers to the density of tines on the carding cloth. When you have a low TPI count, it means there is plenty of room between the tines to accommodate thicker fibres. A high TPI count gives you closer packed tines that are more efficient for carding fine fibres. If you were to ever try carding a fine fibre on a coarse carder you would quickly see that nepps begin to form as the fibres are at greater risk of breakage due to the coarser tines. If you try to card a very coarse fibre on a fine cloth you will have difficulty cranking the handle as the finer tines try to hang on to the larger fibres but are unable to penetrate them to open them up. And this is what a carder does, what it is made for, taking your washed locks and opening them up and smoothing them out, giving you an even blend of draft-able fibres ready to spin.

One way to match up your cloth with your fibre is by paying attention to the micron counts (approximate) of your fleece. For our purposes, lets consider that anything between 18-24 micron is ‘fine’, that 24-32 Micron fibers are ‘medium’ and 33+ micron fibers are ‘coarse’.

Now its time to consider your requirements!

You may want to ‘mostly’ make smooth and well blended batts, and you may want to do this with your ready supply of medium micron Corriedale. In this case the Fusion Engine carder with a 72tpi cloth is going to be great! It will work wonderfully with medium fibres (such as Corriedale, BFL, Suffolk, Perendale etc), it will also handle the medium to coarse fibres well, so long as you are a little careful about their preparation before feeding them into the carder by making sure they are pre-opened. You do that by flicking the ends open with your flick carder (that comes with your drum carder) and hand-picking them to pull thick locks apart. So long as you are feeding in small amounts at a time you should be happy with the result you get using the 72TPI cloth with  most coarser fibres, and for your medium micron fibres the 72TPI will do a fantastic job of making beautiful blended batts.

You can also make textured art batts on this same 72 TPI carder. I will come back to this soon with some tips and tricks to keep the texture in your fibre despite putting it through a drum carder!

If you work mostly with fine fibres, you would definitely be wanting to look at the finer cloth, and the 128 TPI cloth that Majacraft supplies for the Fusion Engine is excellent for making thoroughly blended smooth batts with fine fibres such as Merino, Cormo, fine Alpaca, Shetland, Polwarth etc. You can be confident that your fibres will not be damaged when they are well prepared and gently carded on the Fusion Engine with the 128 cloth.

Here are a couple of charts that you might find useful when making your carding cloth choices! You can view them here or click the links to view them full size. The first is about making smooth blended batts on your drum carder with both kinds of cloth, and the second about Textured art batts. Click the image for a closer look and feel free to download and print if you would like to keep these as a reference. For troubleshooting please scroll to the end of the page!

In these charts you can see (hopefully) the steps for carding both a smooth and a textured batt, using either cloth. Just keep in mind that the 128tpi cloth is not the one you want to choose if you are planning on making mostly textured art batts, even if you have a lot of fine fibre to put in them. The job of the carder is primarily to open out and smooth the fibres you feed in, and the 128TPI does that very efficiently! There are ways to ‘trick’ the carder to leave some texture in, but if you are wanting to make more textured than smooth batts I would strongly suggest you choose the 72TPI cloth as it is more versatile in handling a range of fibres, you then only need to alter the ways you need to prepare and feed in fibre to get different kinds of batts from it. (As shown in the video above).

The 128TPI is really most suited to making well blended batts with fine fibres, which it does very efficiently, it is also fantastic for colour blending as the number of passes you need to make to get a good blend is less than on any lower ratio carders. If you want to keep colour variation as a feature of your batt you simply pre-card your individual colours and then put them together into your final batt for one pass, and you will get some distinct colours.

What follows is a photo series to give you some idea of the efficiency of this machine with the 128TPI cloth, and mixed fine fibres including some previously uncarded locks,  images taken during a colour blending session.

I started with a mix of kid mohair, silk, Polwarth hogget (young sheep) and some Angelina:

I fed on fairly thin layers, alternating the fibre type, to enhance the blending:

This is the result of the first pass, you can still see the individual fibres and colours, but it is all blended into an easy to draft from batt. You can still see defined curl and crimp texture too. If you spun this now it would give you a wonderful,  gently textured yarn.

The second pass yielded this result, smoother and with more blending visible. This would give you a smoother yarn with some distinct colour variations:

The third pass gave me this, and you can now see the colour getting more blended, the yarn from this will be a mostly evenly coloured with still some interesting colour variations:

And the fourth pass produces this wonderfully smoothly fluffy (remember the Mohair?!) pink batt: This will create a fairly evenly pink yarn and I plan to spin it quite fine.

So with this 128TPI cloth I created the batt I wanted from my mix of fine fibres, it is light, fluffy, has some sheen from the silk and mohair along with some bounce from the Polwarth. Four passes was all I needed for this!

Now to try the pre-carded roving and commercial top for a colour only blend! Here are my results:

One pass in which I layers the three colours (brown, grey, and white) in thin layers:

The white streaks are tencel which I 'painted' onto the main drum directly because I wanted blocks of bling in the batt. You do this by 'stroking' the fiber against the tines as you are cranking it.

The second pass gave me a more blended colour:

and the third and final pass gave me a very homogenous blend, in which the brown tone really warm up the grey, the white lightens it, while as a whole  it looks more like a single colour with some rich depth to it. If you wanted to blend it even further it would not harm the fibres on this 128TPI cloth to continue for another two or even three passes, the only consideration is not to crank it too quickly, especially with the 8-1 ratio of the Fusion Engine, you don't need to as all the gears do the work for you!

Troubleshooting:

Even if you have the right carding cloth for your fibre, you may still have the occasional carding problem. Here are a few tips that might help.

If  you are finding the nepps are still forming in your batt there are several reasons this could happen, even when your cloth and fibre are matched well. Nepps are formed by short pieces of fibre, either from short cuts from the shearing, or from broken fibres caused during carding. To remedy this you can: check that you have shaken out the fibre to remove short cuts, you will also see these as you open up your locks and pick through your fibre supply before you feed it into the carder. Make sure they are all out.

You should also check the strength of your fleece, 'tippy' fleeces, ones that have delicate tips (usually due to weathering) should have tips removed, you can either do that by cutting off the tips with scissors, or pulling your staple holding the tip in one hand and the cut end in the other, breakable tips will come off with a bit of a tug.

Another thing that can cause nepps, especially in very fine fleeces, is residue lanolin in the fleece, if there is still some greasiness in the fibre it will also snag it more and cause breaks which lead to nepps, so make sure your fleece is well washed.

If your colours and fibres are not blending as quickly as you would like, or you are finding large patches of colour that you wanted spread through the batt, you can try splitting your batt into smaller pieces for your subsequent passes, try 6 strips instead of three, and spread them the width of the feedtray to create really thin layers.

If you are hearing the tines meshing while you are carding you can make adjustments to the licker in position to find the optimal setting for your carding needs. Do not be scared to move this around, it is useful to change the distance between the licker in and the main drum to get different kinds of batts. In general you want it as close as possible to the main drum without the tines touching. If you want to create more textured batts with a bit less blending, you can move the licker in further away from the main drum to allow more fiber to transfer to the drum at once, reducing the 'carding' action - this is great for art batts.  You can see how to make this adjustment on our video HERE.

 

 

We hope you have gained some useful information about which carding cloth will most suit your fibre and batt making needs! But as always, please feel free to contact us for more information about the carders, the accessories, and delivery times, and contact me (Suzy)  directly if you need any help using your carder or in deciding which cloth you need! (suzy@woolwench.com)


 

 

 

 

 

2Aug/151

All the Wheels!

The simple art of adding twist to fibers. Spinning. It doesnt seem too hard does it?! And yet for most of us, it is a continual learning curve, once started it seems our discovering is never 'finished'. For which I am very thankful! It amazes me that after all this time as a spinner I still find there is so much yet to learn and new things to find out. No wonder we are all hooked! Ours is a craft that continues to allow us to push boundaries, to practice traditions, and to combine a love of colour with a love of texture and play with the wonderful fibers that are available to us today.

And then there are the wheels.

The right wheel allows us to create the yarn we want. It becomes an extension of ourselves, the instrument with which we are so familiar we can almost instinctively create what we have in our heads. In fact the wheel becomes almost invisible in the process, if it is the right wheel,  you do not need to fight it, you don't need to pay it extra attention and it lets you you focus soley on the process of your creation, supporting your requirements by offering you ease of use and adjustment capabilities that let you stretch your own boundaries as you learn and grow as a spinner.  This is precisely why I have stuck with Majacraft tools for years now, because I know I can count on them to respond to my style of usage and give me the freedom to get the results I have already imagined in my head.

There are so many spinning wheels choose from though! It can be very daunting to a beginner spinner: single or double treadle? Scotch or Irish tension, or Double Drive? What size bobbins, and what on earth are 'ratios' anyway?!

And for the more advanced spinner, often moving from one wheel to another as their spinning needs change, decisions  come down to what kind of yarn they want to spin, bobbin capacity requirements, even just that a wheel is 'pretty' can be enough reason to add to the wheel collection :)  But again, it always takes some research into what wheels are available, and matching that up with what you anticipate you will most likely want to spin the most of. A big consideration in choosing a new wheel is being able to find one that will grow with you and not restrict your spinning to just one style as you expand your interests and skills.

Of course, if you are like me, you will not know exactly what you will always want to spin in advance, OR you will know that actually, you want to be able to spin absolutely anything! One solution to this is to have multiple wheels, but another is to have one wheel with multiple accessories that allow you to specialise in more than one spinning style. Majacraft offers us, as spinners, this second option beautifully.

We can go from this lace spinning set up:

to this art yarn or production spinning on the Overdrive:

and everything in between, and all on the one wheel!

All the important parts like flyers, bobbins, and different pulley sizes, are interchangeable between most of the Majacraft Wheels.

I have my One Wheel, the Aura, which suits my spinning style perfectly. I can spin anything on it. I use my Overdrive for giant yarns in large quantities, also for spinning multiple batts in one session. I have fit 5 batts on one bobbin with barely a pause between, and it removes any possibility of not quite having enough room on my bobbin to finish plying those last ten yards of single from a one off batt.

I can also spin fine on this self same wheel, using the lace bobbin and flyer. As an example of the really stunning possibilities check out the wonderful lace spinning of Evanita Montalvo, spun on her Aura using the Aura Lace Kit with the Flyer, Lace Bobbin, and lace whorl/pulley.

This is one of the greatest strengths of Majacraft spinning wheels, they have so many accessories and interchangeable parts that one wheel is often all you need even when your spinning requirements change (which of course they do over time).

So here is my big tip if you are wondering which wheel you should buy. Think about your current spinning needs, rather than trying to predict what you will be spinning in two years time.

Do you want to spin a LOT of lace weight and fine yarns? But you think you might want to do an occasional bulky yarn? You could consider a Rose, which will spin wonderful fine traditional yarns out of the box. You can add a laceweight flyer head to that for your big projects and save yourself some treadling with the high ratios it offers you. And later you can even add the Wild Flyer and Jumbo bobbins for your bigger yarns. Then if you really get extreme one day, most Rose wheels will also fit the amazing Overdrive head with its 32oz bobbins! All this on one wheel :)

If you are primarily interested in big yarns, art yarns, and experimental spinning, you might choose the Aura, with its fine adjustments and double drive, it gives you a huge range of spinning possibilities on any kind of yarn. It comes standard with the Jumbo bobbins and has the amazing and unique 'pigtail' orifice that keeps your yarn steady while still being totally bypassable when necessary. But you can spin traditional yarn on this wheel too! It gives you a total set and forget adjustment because the double drive system maintains the same flyer-bobbin ratio from start to finish, unlike other tension systems that require multiple adjustments as your bobbin fills. Add a Lace kit for fine and an Overdrive for giant, keep the Jumbo bobbins for your 'everyday' spinning.

If you need a travel wheel then the Little Gem (my other baby) is perfect, because it will also fit your lace bobbins and flyer as well as your jumbo and wild flyer combinations! It comes with the standard bobbins too so you have a full range even with your travel wheel. It could also be your only wheel and you could still spin anything with the right accessories.

So when it comes to choosing your wheel - plan for the short term. You know what you want to spin now, and be confident that with a Majacraft wheel, the wide range of  interchangeable accessories and extra spinning heads will allow you to expand your  future spinning without needing to buy an entire new wheel.

You can check out the wheels and accessories on the website right here: http://www.majacraft.co.nz/wheels.php  And remember you can contact me (Suzy@woolwench.com) any time if you would like some extra help to choose the right wheel for you!

Till next time

Happy Spinning!