The Majacraft Blog The official blog of Majacraft

4Oct/152

The Third and Final Circle Weave Along Tutorial!

And here we are! Thank you so much to everyone who has joined in with us on this fun project, we have LOVED seeing your beautiful weaving and knitting and have very much enjoyed the individual creative approaches you have each taken with this project. I am personally very excited to see the variety and variations on the theme and design as you have created and made it your own!  Now we know that not everyone has kept up with the weekly activity, but this is just fine, its like stretching our christmas over a longer period of time, and we hope to see people continue to post their finished projects and progress photos on the Circle Weave CWAL event page! https://www.facebook.com/events/548102112007017/

This week we just have the video to share, the final steps are fairly straight forward, involving joining the second woven circle to the knitted length of scarf and then adding the tassels. I hope you will enjoy this stage and the video!

Happy CWAL-ing!

Suzy

 

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27Sep/153

Circle Weave Along Tutorial Part 2!

Our Circle Weave Along project has been running for a week now! It has been super fun seeing people starting to post their progress photos on the Event page, here are a few really neat ones:

Simone Broersma is using some beautiful colours and a bulky yarn for the warp, this is going to look lovely!

 

Kate Winkler has made a wonderful theme of 'warm' and 'cold' colours for each end of the scarf:

 

Jacquie Chalmers has used a lovely spiral technique to make swirls for her scarf ends:

I am looking forward to seeing what the next week will bring! Here is part two of the tutorial, again we have the video plus the written tutorial, they really go together :) There is plenty of scope for your own creative flair to shine in this project

Here is the download of the written tutorial for Part 2 (click the image)

 

And here is the video to go with it. I hope you enjoy it!

Suzy

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20Sep/151

Circle Weave Along #1

This week is the start of the first of what we hope will become regular events, an online 'Along'. Wondering what that is? Well for this 'Along' we are going to Circle Weave a scarf! We would like to invite you to join us and follow along to make your own!

It works like this:

Over the next three weeks we will use the Facebook Events page as our home base for the Weave Along project. The three weeks will look like this:

Week 1. Weaving the circles

Week 2: Attaching the first circle and knitting and or crocheting the scarf centre length

Week 3: Attaching the second circle, finishing (weaving in ends) and creating the tassles

Each week there will be a new Tutorial for that part of the project, the tutorial will include both a video and a downloadable set of instructions to go with it. I will also be available on the Event page on Facebook to answer any questions and help out as needed.

I hope you will also post your progress photos on the Event page!

The Scarf is a design I came up with specifically for this Weave Along, I wanted to share something that anyone could have a go at, and it covers the basics of warping and weaving in plain weave. I hope we can encourage some people to get started for the first time with their weaving! If you are a more advanced weaver you are very welcome to add your own design into this project, you might want to add embellishments, different weave patterns in the circles, and play around with textures. The same goes for knitters! I have made this very simple but please view it as a base, if you wish to add to the design in any way this is NOT a pattern that must be followed, rather it is a GUIDE from which you can grow your own unique scarf! With all this in mind, plus the possibility that we will all bring different yarns to the project, I have deliberately left it simple and un-patternlike, I will be providing you with techniques and measurements, as well as suggestions for things like, how to deal with different yarn sizes within the project.

Today I am posting the first Tutorial! Please follow the link to pick up your free download of instruction, it includes a warping pattern and information about materials and weaving your circle and is designed to go along with the video (below), these two things are integral to each other. please take the time to read over the document first and then watch the video.

Download the written part of the Tutorial by clicking on the cover:

Watch the Tutorial Video:


For more information and warping patterns don't forget there is also the Warp Speed booklet that Andrew and I created, there are plenty more patterns in there as well as a template for making your own mid size circles. Just in case you are inspired to do some more after this project is completed!

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24Aug/156

Choosing the Right Carding Cloth

For the Majacraft Fusion Engine Drum Carder 

Majacraft now has in stock both the 72tpi and the 128tpi carding cloth for the amazing new Fusion Engine Drum carder. This raises a few questions! The first, and most important one is, ‘which cloth doth suit me best?’ So we thought it might be useful to create a guide to help you with that decision. What follows is really a full tutorial about carding, with extra info and tips for getting the results you want from the cloth you choose. For a quick guide, scroll down to the two flowcharts to check which carding cloth works best with the fibres you plan to card!

A while ago I made a review of the carder, and also a video  to show some of the amazing things that are possible with it, and highlight some of the unique ways this carder is different from others currently on the market.

That video was made entirely on the 72TPI carder, and in it I showed how I made both a smooth blended batt and a textured art batt.  When I have time I will make a similar one with the 128TPI cloth! In the meantime however, I wanted to share some information that might make it easier to decide which carding cloth you want to start out with. Of course the upside is that the drums are interchangeable so you can also be confident that you are not going to be stuck with the ‘wrong’ carding cloth if your carding needs change in a year or two..

So here’s the thing, the important thing. Your carding cloth just needs to be matched up with the kind of fibre you are ‘mostly’ going to be carding. You can make a smooth batt or a textured batt on pretty much any carder, so long as you have a cloth that is appropriate to the fibre you are using. Generally speaking this means that if you have coarse fibre you need a coarse cloth, for example most of your carding is going to be Lincoln, or Leicester, then you would want to consider a coarse cloth in the 45-52TPI range. If the majority of your fibre is fine, such as Merino, Alpaca, or Cormo, then you need to look for a carding cloth in the ‘fine’ range, 92TPI and over. Majacraft is providing a very versatile 72TPI cloth that works great on most fibres, and for those wishing to focus on the finer fibres as the majority of their carding, the 128TPI cloth is wonderful!

This is how it works, ‘TPI’  stands for ‘Tines Per Inch’ and refers to the density of tines on the carding cloth. When you have a low TPI count, it means there is plenty of room between the tines to accommodate thicker fibres. A high TPI count gives you closer packed tines that are more efficient for carding fine fibres. If you were to ever try carding a fine fibre on a coarse carder you would quickly see that nepps begin to form as the fibres are at greater risk of breakage due to the coarser tines. If you try to card a very coarse fibre on a fine cloth you will have difficulty cranking the handle as the finer tines try to hang on to the larger fibres but are unable to penetrate them to open them up. And this is what a carder does, what it is made for, taking your washed locks and opening them up and smoothing them out, giving you an even blend of draft-able fibres ready to spin.

One way to match up your cloth with your fibre is by paying attention to the micron counts (approximate) of your fleece. For our purposes, lets consider that anything between 18-24 micron is ‘fine’, that 24-32 Micron fibers are ‘medium’ and 33+ micron fibers are ‘coarse’.

Now its time to consider your requirements!

You may want to ‘mostly’ make smooth and well blended batts, and you may want to do this with your ready supply of medium micron Corriedale. In this case the Fusion Engine carder with a 72tpi cloth is going to be great! It will work wonderfully with medium fibres (such as Corriedale, BFL, Suffolk, Perendale etc), it will also handle the medium to coarse fibres well, so long as you are a little careful about their preparation before feeding them into the carder by making sure they are pre-opened. You do that by flicking the ends open with your flick carder (that comes with your drum carder) and hand-picking them to pull thick locks apart. So long as you are feeding in small amounts at a time you should be happy with the result you get using the 72TPI cloth with  most coarser fibres, and for your medium micron fibres the 72TPI will do a fantastic job of making beautiful blended batts.

You can also make textured art batts on this same 72 TPI carder. I will come back to this soon with some tips and tricks to keep the texture in your fibre despite putting it through a drum carder!

If you work mostly with fine fibres, you would definitely be wanting to look at the finer cloth, and the 128 TPI cloth that Majacraft supplies for the Fusion Engine is excellent for making thoroughly blended smooth batts with fine fibres such as Merino, Cormo, fine Alpaca, Shetland, Polwarth etc. You can be confident that your fibres will not be damaged when they are well prepared and gently carded on the Fusion Engine with the 128 cloth.

Here are a couple of charts that you might find useful when making your carding cloth choices! You can view them here or click the links to view them full size. The first is about making smooth blended batts on your drum carder with both kinds of cloth, and the second about Textured art batts. Click the image for a closer look and feel free to download and print if you would like to keep these as a reference. For troubleshooting please scroll to the end of the page!

In these charts you can see (hopefully) the steps for carding both a smooth and a textured batt, using either cloth. Just keep in mind that the 128tpi cloth is not the one you want to choose if you are planning on making mostly textured art batts, even if you have a lot of fine fibre to put in them. The job of the carder is primarily to open out and smooth the fibres you feed in, and the 128TPI does that very efficiently! There are ways to ‘trick’ the carder to leave some texture in, but if you are wanting to make more textured than smooth batts I would strongly suggest you choose the 72TPI cloth as it is more versatile in handling a range of fibres, you then only need to alter the ways you need to prepare and feed in fibre to get different kinds of batts from it. (As shown in the video above).

The 128TPI is really most suited to making well blended batts with fine fibres, which it does very efficiently, it is also fantastic for colour blending as the number of passes you need to make to get a good blend is less than on any lower ratio carders. If you want to keep colour variation as a feature of your batt you simply pre-card your individual colours and then put them together into your final batt for one pass, and you will get some distinct colours.

What follows is a photo series to give you some idea of the efficiency of this machine with the 128TPI cloth, and mixed fine fibres including some previously uncarded locks,  images taken during a colour blending session.

I started with a mix of kid mohair, silk, Polwarth hogget (young sheep) and some Angelina:

I fed on fairly thin layers, alternating the fibre type, to enhance the blending:

This is the result of the first pass, you can still see the individual fibres and colours, but it is all blended into an easy to draft from batt. You can still see defined curl and crimp texture too. If you spun this now it would give you a wonderful,  gently textured yarn.

The second pass yielded this result, smoother and with more blending visible. This would give you a smoother yarn with some distinct colour variations:

The third pass gave me this, and you can now see the colour getting more blended, the yarn from this will be a mostly evenly coloured with still some interesting colour variations:

And the fourth pass produces this wonderfully smoothly fluffy (remember the Mohair?!) pink batt: This will create a fairly evenly pink yarn and I plan to spin it quite fine.

So with this 128TPI cloth I created the batt I wanted from my mix of fine fibres, it is light, fluffy, has some sheen from the silk and mohair along with some bounce from the Polwarth. Four passes was all I needed for this!

Now to try the pre-carded roving and commercial top for a colour only blend! Here are my results:

One pass in which I layers the three colours (brown, grey, and white) in thin layers:

The white streaks are tencel which I 'painted' onto the main drum directly because I wanted blocks of bling in the batt. You do this by 'stroking' the fiber against the tines as you are cranking it.

The second pass gave me a more blended colour:

and the third and final pass gave me a very homogenous blend, in which the brown tone really warm up the grey, the white lightens it, while as a whole  it looks more like a single colour with some rich depth to it. If you wanted to blend it even further it would not harm the fibres on this 128TPI cloth to continue for another two or even three passes, the only consideration is not to crank it too quickly, especially with the 8-1 ratio of the Fusion Engine, you don't need to as all the gears do the work for you!

Troubleshooting:

Even if you have the right carding cloth for your fibre, you may still have the occasional carding problem. Here are a few tips that might help.

If  you are finding the nepps are still forming in your batt there are several reasons this could happen, even when your cloth and fibre are matched well. Nepps are formed by short pieces of fibre, either from short cuts from the shearing, or from broken fibres caused during carding. To remedy this you can: check that you have shaken out the fibre to remove short cuts, you will also see these as you open up your locks and pick through your fibre supply before you feed it into the carder. Make sure they are all out.

You should also check the strength of your fleece, 'tippy' fleeces, ones that have delicate tips (usually due to weathering) should have tips removed, you can either do that by cutting off the tips with scissors, or pulling your staple holding the tip in one hand and the cut end in the other, breakable tips will come off with a bit of a tug.

Another thing that can cause nepps, especially in very fine fleeces, is residue lanolin in the fleece, if there is still some greasiness in the fibre it will also snag it more and cause breaks which lead to nepps, so make sure your fleece is well washed.

If your colours and fibres are not blending as quickly as you would like, or you are finding large patches of colour that you wanted spread through the batt, you can try splitting your batt into smaller pieces for your subsequent passes, try 6 strips instead of three, and spread them the width of the feedtray to create really thin layers.

If you are hearing the tines meshing while you are carding you can make adjustments to the licker in position to find the optimal setting for your carding needs. Do not be scared to move this around, it is useful to change the distance between the licker in and the main drum to get different kinds of batts. In general you want it as close as possible to the main drum without the tines touching. If you want to create more textured batts with a bit less blending, you can move the licker in further away from the main drum to allow more fiber to transfer to the drum at once, reducing the 'carding' action - this is great for art batts.  You can see how to make this adjustment on our video HERE.

 

 

We hope you have gained some useful information about which carding cloth will most suit your fibre and batt making needs! But as always, please feel free to contact us for more information about the carders, the accessories, and delivery times, and contact me (Suzy)  directly if you need any help using your carder or in deciding which cloth you need! (suzy@woolwench.com)


 

 

 

 

 

8Aug/154

Majacraft Tutorial: Making Tweedie Yarn

Hi Everyone! This week I wanted to share a project with you that I have been having fun with recently! If you have been following our Facebook page you will have seen that I am currently playing with the new 128tpi cloth drum on my Fusion Engine Carder (its so great with my fine fibres!). If you are also feeling inclined to do a bit of carding and spin along with me, I have created a mini tutorial for you right here! We are going to make a Textured Tweed style yarn, and I think you will enjoy how easy and fun this is to make.

The first step is to choose the right fibers. Remember, preparation is everything! Choose your main fibre, I selected a dark colour (Charcoal)  because I wanted something contrasting in my final yarn, but you can make this any colour you like, it will be the primary colour of your yarn.

For the main fibre, select one with a medium to long staple length such as Corriedale, BFL, or even Merino is just fine for this, the important part is that the main fibre is much longer in staple length than your 'texture' fibre. Mine is a NZHalfbred blend with a staple length of about 7-8cm.

For your textured  fibre, select one that is very very short, such as Yak, Cashmere, neppy Camel down,  silk noil, or you could even save up and use the waste from your carding and combing! I used some beautiful soft but very neppy ultrafine Merino. You can see the difference in staple length in the photo, in fact the pale coloured fibre almost has no staples at all:

You will need more of your base colour fibre than of the short texture fibre. Your fibre proportions are entirely up to you however,  depending on the amount of tweedy texture you want in your fiber. You will see in your batt as you add the textured fibre if you are getting the effect and quantities you want. Because now is the time to card it together!

Carding and Blending
You will be blending this at least two times. For the first run through the carder start by puting a thin layer of your base colour on the drum first. Then you can start adding more fibre, I like to lay some of the short fibre on top of the longer and run them through the licker and onto the drum together, but you might like to add them in separately.

You will start to see the effect very quickly as you card and your short fibres start to feed onto the drum:

 

When you have filled the drum as much as you want to and have achieved approximately the proportion of texture to base colour that you like, you can go ahead and remove the batt, split it into four lengths, and recard these, spreading them across the width of the feedtray to enhance the blending. You will see on the second pass that your short fibers are spreading through the batt.

If you are using one of our Fusion Engine Drum carders, with the very efficient carding ratio of 8-1, you are likely to find that just two passes is enough to get the tweedy effect you want. If you overcard this your little clumps of fibre and noils will get broken down too much and you are likely to lose some of the texture and contrast, so stop at the point where you feel you have a good distruction of texture versus base fibre, on some carders this may take three or four passes to get the effect you want. I liked this effect in my finished batt so I stopped at two passes:

And now we can spin the yarn! The idea with a tweed style yarn is that it should be light and textured, you can certainly spin this longdraw if you like, or you might like to spin it as I do simply by splitting the batts into strips and spinning it with a light forward draw in which I do not smooth the yarn down as I spin.

You will see you little clumps of texture fibre coming through as you draft, caught into the longer base fibres. Try not to smooth these down as you spin them in, they will get trapped into the twist and when we 'finish' the yarn will be quite stable.

I spun my yarn on my Little Gem, and created it as a simple balanced two ply, splitting my batt in half and spinning onto two bobbins. Here is how it looked freshly plied and on the bobbin:

The next step is very important!

Finishing and setting the yarn. This is particularly important for this yarn, because it not only sets the twist but it also fulls the yarn slightly, and this in turn helps to trap those short fibers into the final yarn, reducing the chance of them simply pilling up and pulling out. In this step you need to skein up your yarn, tie it well in four places, then immerse it into some hot water with a little wool soap. Let it sit five minutes. At this point I will give the yarn a little agitation, rough it up in the water a bit! And then take it out of the hot water and put it directly into cold water, swirl it around a bit more. Repeat this step several times. You should be able to 'feel' the fibre change its character a little and not only bloom but also become more (and this is the only word I can come up with to describe this) combined as the fibres start to grab onto each other.  Next press out the excess water. Once you have done that, and this is something I do not do to all my yarns but it works very well on this one, 'thwack' it against a hard surface. It feels mean and a little crazy, but its ok! It works to finish off that fulling process, it fluffs up your yarn somewhat, and remember this is a desirable character of tweed style yarns, and it further integrates your nepps and short fibers into the structure of the yarn.

This is how my finished yarn turned out: (to see them closer click the pic)


And here is another one I made using the same technique and the same texture yarn, only this time my base fibre was a soft grey NZ Arapawa.
And just in case you are wondering, this is how they look when they are knitted up!

I really love this effect, it can be subtle and create a gentle texture and colour variation in your yarn, or you can do this with many different colour and texture combinations to get more extreme yarns with pops of mega-textures. I love how easy it was to prepare the fibre for this yarn and the simple spinning that I enjoy when I want to just relax. For some other variations you could try plying this as a four ply cable yarn, or add an auto-wrap, or even coil your single instead of ply it! There are many possibilities for using this particular fibre prep, and  I hope you enjoy experimenting with this yarn too!

 

Till next time, happy spinning!
Suzy (WoolWench)

To create this yarn I used: the Fusion Engine Drum Carder with a 128tpi cloth drum, the Little Gem spinning wheel set on the medium size pulley and the standard delta flyer, and a mix of longer staple and very short staple fibres.


2Aug/151

All the Wheels!

The simple art of adding twist to fibers. Spinning. It doesnt seem too hard does it?! And yet for most of us, it is a continual learning curve, once started it seems our discovering is never 'finished'. For which I am very thankful! It amazes me that after all this time as a spinner I still find there is so much yet to learn and new things to find out. No wonder we are all hooked! Ours is a craft that continues to allow us to push boundaries, to practice traditions, and to combine a love of colour with a love of texture and play with the wonderful fibers that are available to us today.

And then there are the wheels.

The right wheel allows us to create the yarn we want. It becomes an extension of ourselves, the instrument with which we are so familiar we can almost instinctively create what we have in our heads. In fact the wheel becomes almost invisible in the process, if it is the right wheel,  you do not need to fight it, you don't need to pay it extra attention and it lets you you focus soley on the process of your creation, supporting your requirements by offering you ease of use and adjustment capabilities that let you stretch your own boundaries as you learn and grow as a spinner.  This is precisely why I have stuck with Majacraft tools for years now, because I know I can count on them to respond to my style of usage and give me the freedom to get the results I have already imagined in my head.

There are so many spinning wheels choose from though! It can be very daunting to a beginner spinner: single or double treadle? Scotch or Irish tension, or Double Drive? What size bobbins, and what on earth are 'ratios' anyway?!

And for the more advanced spinner, often moving from one wheel to another as their spinning needs change, decisions  come down to what kind of yarn they want to spin, bobbin capacity requirements, even just that a wheel is 'pretty' can be enough reason to add to the wheel collection :)  But again, it always takes some research into what wheels are available, and matching that up with what you anticipate you will most likely want to spin the most of. A big consideration in choosing a new wheel is being able to find one that will grow with you and not restrict your spinning to just one style as you expand your interests and skills.

Of course, if you are like me, you will not know exactly what you will always want to spin in advance, OR you will know that actually, you want to be able to spin absolutely anything! One solution to this is to have multiple wheels, but another is to have one wheel with multiple accessories that allow you to specialise in more than one spinning style. Majacraft offers us, as spinners, this second option beautifully.

We can go from this lace spinning set up:

to this art yarn or production spinning on the Overdrive:

and everything in between, and all on the one wheel!

All the important parts like flyers, bobbins, and different pulley sizes, are interchangeable between most of the Majacraft Wheels.

I have my One Wheel, the Aura, which suits my spinning style perfectly. I can spin anything on it. I use my Overdrive for giant yarns in large quantities, also for spinning multiple batts in one session. I have fit 5 batts on one bobbin with barely a pause between, and it removes any possibility of not quite having enough room on my bobbin to finish plying those last ten yards of single from a one off batt.

I can also spin fine on this self same wheel, using the lace bobbin and flyer. As an example of the really stunning possibilities check out the wonderful lace spinning of Evanita Montalvo, spun on her Aura using the Aura Lace Kit with the Flyer, Lace Bobbin, and lace whorl/pulley.

This is one of the greatest strengths of Majacraft spinning wheels, they have so many accessories and interchangeable parts that one wheel is often all you need even when your spinning requirements change (which of course they do over time).

So here is my big tip if you are wondering which wheel you should buy. Think about your current spinning needs, rather than trying to predict what you will be spinning in two years time.

Do you want to spin a LOT of lace weight and fine yarns? But you think you might want to do an occasional bulky yarn? You could consider a Rose, which will spin wonderful fine traditional yarns out of the box. You can add a laceweight flyer head to that for your big projects and save yourself some treadling with the high ratios it offers you. And later you can even add the Wild Flyer and Jumbo bobbins for your bigger yarns. Then if you really get extreme one day, most Rose wheels will also fit the amazing Overdrive head with its 32oz bobbins! All this on one wheel :)

If you are primarily interested in big yarns, art yarns, and experimental spinning, you might choose the Aura, with its fine adjustments and double drive, it gives you a huge range of spinning possibilities on any kind of yarn. It comes standard with the Jumbo bobbins and has the amazing and unique 'pigtail' orifice that keeps your yarn steady while still being totally bypassable when necessary. But you can spin traditional yarn on this wheel too! It gives you a total set and forget adjustment because the double drive system maintains the same flyer-bobbin ratio from start to finish, unlike other tension systems that require multiple adjustments as your bobbin fills. Add a Lace kit for fine and an Overdrive for giant, keep the Jumbo bobbins for your 'everyday' spinning.

If you need a travel wheel then the Little Gem (my other baby) is perfect, because it will also fit your lace bobbins and flyer as well as your jumbo and wild flyer combinations! It comes with the standard bobbins too so you have a full range even with your travel wheel. It could also be your only wheel and you could still spin anything with the right accessories.

So when it comes to choosing your wheel - plan for the short term. You know what you want to spin now, and be confident that with a Majacraft wheel, the wide range of  interchangeable accessories and extra spinning heads will allow you to expand your  future spinning without needing to buy an entire new wheel.

You can check out the wheels and accessories on the website right here: http://www.majacraft.co.nz/wheels.php  And remember you can contact me (Suzy@woolwench.com) any time if you would like some extra help to choose the right wheel for you!

Till next time

Happy Spinning!

 

21Jul/1517

Something is Changing at Majacraft!

Welcome to the first of my (Suzy's) Majacraft blogposts! This is my introduction,  coming to you from the WoolWench – Suzy Brown studio in Napier New Zealand. Today I would like to share a bit of background about why I am writing this blogpost, as the newest member of the Majacraft team.

Here is me:

I’m a spinner who loves to spin any kind of yarn, fine and lacey, to big bold and bouncy arty yarns. My website has a gallery of my spinning if you are interested in seeing what I love to do.(www.woolwench.com). Most people who know my spinning also know I have my ‘One Wheel’ which is the fantastic Aura that Majacraft customised for me a few years ago and which is my dream wheel. Since then I have been lucky enough to add a Little Gem to my stable, along with a Majacraft dynamic heddle loom, hand combs, hackle, blending board, drum carder… Shall we just say I am very particular and wont use anything non-Majacraft in my fiber crafts?

Last year, my business partner Arlene Thayer (Spin Artiste) and I launched our online fiber arts education website Fiberygoodness.com, and as a major component to our flagship course ‘Journey to the Golden Fleece’ I worked with Majacraft to develop the Circular loom, which has become a great success! Together we have grown a wonderful group page on Facebook where people share their circular creations and inspirations, and it has been exciting to see this product grow in use and application.

I also worked with (ok nagged) Majacraft on the development of the Overdrive Spinning Head for production and bulky yarn spinning, it was a thrill to share in the making and the launch of this fantastic accessory (here we are on You Tube) which has opened up many new possibilities in my spinning practice.

Now I have returned to my home in New Zealand after 12 years residence in the Netherlands. The opportunity to work more closely and on a more ‘official’ level with Majacraft as their brand new Enablement Manager came at the perfect time, and in tandem with my plans for expanding Fiberygoodness it is the ideal match! I feel blessed to be able to follow my dreams in this way.

In the near future I plan to bring you some fun projects right here on the blog: things to make with your Majacraft wheel or loom, and tool tips and tutorials for the big range of tools we produce. I will also be working to expand the Majacraft You Tube channel with more tool specific demo’s and projects! Let me know what you would most like to see in a Majacraft video and I will do my best to make it!  I will be posting regular customer newsletters so if you want to hear early about any fun activities coming up you should sign up RIGHT HERE!

I would like you to feel comfortable to contact me if you have any questions about Majacraft products such as ‘should I get the one pitch or the two pitch hackle?’ or ‘which carding cloth should I start with on my Fusion Engine?’. I would be happy to give you my take on these kinds of questions in the context of what you want to achieve. I hope my experience as a fibre artist and a user of Majacraft equipment can be of service to you in helping you make good choices if you need it.

I look forward to sharing some fun activities with you and getting to know you better!

20Mar/150

Introducing the Fusion Engine

We have built a drum carder. It is called the Fusion Engine and to be honest, I think it is pretty amazing!

Fusion Engine left

The Fusion Engine left hand side

 

Fusion Engine right

Fusion Engine right hand side

 

It is packed full of features and innovations that make this drum carder incredibly versatile and easy to use.

Many of the design choices are focussed around creating a machine that does not require cleaning. The drums have special edges that minimise the possibility of fibre wrapping around the axles while packing fibre on to the drum right out to the edge. The drums are interchangeable and we will be building drums with different cloth so you can use finer or coarser cloth depending on what you want to do.

Fusion Engine magic drum

Fusion Engine magic drum

 

It has an integrated gearbox that uses actual gears and these are hidden in the side of the carder. The ratio runs at 8:1 so there is considerably more blending of fibre that goes on compared to machines that run at 3:1 - 4:1. The gears are always positive and will never slip and being integrated into the side of the carder means there is never any clogging of fibre around the drive mechanism.

Fusion Engine gearbox detail

Fusion Engine gearbox detail

 

It has a movable feed tray that you can slide back and forth depending on whether you are working with fine fibre or something a little more raw.

This is just a basic introduction to the Fusion Engine. If you want to discover more, read about it on the Majacraft web site here.

We have the freely downloadable manual for the Fusion Engine which also has plenty of fibre preparation tips

Fusion Engine manual

Fusion Engine manual


Suzy Brown of Woolwench has written a review of a pre-production machine on the Fibery Goodness web site and you can find it here.

If you are interested in a Fusion Engine then I suggest you contact your dealer promptly. Orders for the first run of machines are filling fast!

Until next time
Andrew

Filed under: Carding, Fibre No Comments
2Nov/140

CHANGELOG – 2nd November 2014

Yep, I have been at it again! We get quite a bit of spam through the wheel registration page (no, we don't need any Viagra thanks!) so I have focussed the recent updates to improve this situation

CHANGELOG

REGISTRATION
updated the registration form fields
modified the page to include Majacraft products rather than just wheels
added detailed cross checking validation of the registration numbers
updated the way the Majacraft database is accessed for improved reliability and security

Until next time

Andy

 

Filed under: other stuff No Comments
16Sep/140

Double Heddle Weaving Mounts for the DHL

If you are interested in double heddle weaving on the Dynamic Heddle Loom, we offer some really useful little mounts to support the heddle during the warping of the loom. They have little metal discs so the magnets in the heddle will stick to them and nylon bumpers to set the angle to make warping as simple as possible.

Double heddle mounts

Double heddle mounts


 
You can learn more here Double Heddle Weaving Mounts

Double heddle mounts on loom

Double heddle mounts on loom


 
Double heddle weaving by Annick Keters

Double heddle weaving by Annick Keters


 
Until next time

Andy

Filed under: Accessories, Loom No Comments